Beer Hall: Cherry Festivus, Zoiglhaus’ One Year Celebration, and 10 Barrel’s Pray for Snow Party

These days, you don’t have to give up your hoppy favorites to take a pretty solid trip to the land of European beer.

Pfriem’s excellent pilsner just became the first American-made version to medal in the European Beer Star, and we have an ever-increasing number of breweries and bars dedicated to old-world traditions to go with our decidedly American brewpubs.

This week, spend some of that plane ticket money on a trip to Portland’s own cherry beer festival to taste new and old world krieks, and follow it up by a trip to Lents’ year-old German-style beer hall. But don’t forget to sprinkle in an IPA from Inglewood, a salted caramel stout from a SE Portland suburb, and watch people eat shit on skis while drinking a $3 can of cucumber kettle sour in the middle of NW. Then, laugh in the face of anyone who tells you their town has better beer culture than yours.

They don’t. They just don’t.

Thursday, November 17

Sierra Nevada Beer Camp ChicoCabra Celebration

(Bridget Baker)
(Bridget Baker)

In the world of garage and basement-dwelling homebrewers, a trip to Sierra Nevada’s Beer Camp may as well be a week spent at the Wonka factory. Two of Belmont Station’s own cashed in their golden tickets this past year, returning from Chico with a tasty batch of stout to share with their jealous, beer-soaked universe. Belmont Station, 4500 SE Stark St. 5-7 pm. Free.

Friday, November 18

Cherry Festivus

Hilary Sander
Hilary Sander

The second annual celebration of cherry-infused ales and lagers is a much-expanded affair, now three days long, and including artisanal chocolate pairings. With world-sought pours like Cantillon Kriek, De Garde’s Petit Kriek, and a cherry-filled-randall pour of Ecliptic’s imperial cherry porter, we’ve got two words that pair well with all of the aforementioned changes: Yes, please. Bazi Bierbrasserie, 1522 SE 32nd Ave. 5-11 pm Friday, November 18, 3-11 pm Saturday, November 19, 1-7 pm Sunday. November 20.  

Three Weavers Launch Party

Given their affinity for all things hip-hop, it’s not surprising that the folks at N.W.I.P.A. have taken a liking to Inglewood-based brewery Three Weavers since its inception two years ago. Creators of fantastic ales and lagers both hoppy and otherwise, female brewmaster Alexandria Nowell is the beer equivalent of a 2016 XXL Freshman Class member—making waves from the rap-haven’s 30 barrel brewhouse that are well deserving of a spin (or several pours). N.W.I.P.A., 6350 SE Foster Rd. 6-9 pm. Free.

Saturday, November 19

Zoiglhaus’ First Anniversary Party

Zoiglhaus
(Emily Joan Greene/WW)

Lents-based German-style outpost Zoiglhaus has been slowly gorwing into its massive East Portland space for a full go around the sun, climbing the ranks of bavarian-themed breweries since opening a year ago. They’re already crafting some of the best Helles and Berliner Weiss that this city has ever known, and you can celebrate that fact this evening by tasting some of brewer Alan Taylor’s even rarer stuff, all while listening to the sweet (sweet?) sounds of a band called European Takeout. Zoiglhaus Brewing Company, 5716 SE 92nd Ave. 5-10 pm. Free.

10 Barrel Pray for Snow Party

Emily Joan Greene
Emily Joan Greene

Even the macro gods smile upon ski season. 10 Barrel reaches into its deep pockets to close down two streets near its NW Flanders locale for a snow-packed rail jam that includes $3 cans of Cucumber Crush and Pub Beer all evening long. Cheap sour beer and an opportunity to watch people crash and burn on skis and snowboards in the Pearl District? Say what you want about Budweiser, but they sure know how to throw our kinda party. 10 Barrel Brewing, 1411 NW Flanders St. 5-10 pm. Free.

Tuesday, November 22

Russian River Brewing Night

Five taps of legendary Russian River brewery will take over Green Dragon tonight—with limited-edition bottle sales as well. Expect Supplication sour brown aged in pinot barrels, Temptation sour blonde aged in chardonnay barrels, and Consecration sour dark aged in cabernet barrels, plus Pliny the Elder and Blind Pig. Green Dragon, 928 SE 9th Ave. 5-9 pm. Free.

Breakside Salted Caramel Stout Release

You know your stout is good when an IPA-dedicated beer bar throws it a launch party. Long among the best seasonal dark ales to bless this river town, Breakside’s Salted Caramel Stout ooozes complex, salty-sweet aromas, providing a perfect compliment to the world’s darker days. But with a fully stocked kegerator of other Milwaukee-made creations, there’s still probably something hoppy to sate your lupulin tooth, too. N.W.I.P.A., 6350 SE Foster Rd. 6-9 pm. Free.

Portland’s Aviation Gin Just Got Sold Off to New York—Here’s Why

Portland distiller House Spirits has sold Aviation Gin to a New York marketing firm called Davos Brands.

House Spirits will still make Aviation Gin, but now it will be as a contracted distiller, not as its owner.

“The main event is they acquired all the intellectual property including trademarks,” says House Spirits co-owner Tom Mooney. “Now we’re producing it at much closer to production cost.”

Aviation—the lavender-forward gin hailed nationwide as the original American dry and one of the hallmarks of the craft-distilling movement in this country—was up to now the flagship brand for the Portland distillery, which last year became the largest craft distillery in the Pacific Northwest. Aviation has risen to become the top-selling craft gin in the country.

The official line—the one in the press release—is that the sale will help the Aviation brand grow much bigger than it has already.

“We did quite a feat getting it from zero to 20,000 cases,” says Mooney. “Getting from 20,000 to 100 [thousand] is another feat. They’ve got the sales team, they’ve got the clout with distributors. Aviation will be a much bigger brand than it would have been if we hadn’t sold.”

But saying the brand will grow more under Davos’ ownership is only part of the story behind the sale. Davos has been Aviation’s sales team and marketer since December 2014, meaning Aviation already had access to Davos’ connections and resources while owning the brand.

The other side of the story is that the money from the sale will go toward making whiskey—lots and lots of whiskey. This will effectively transform House Spirits into a single-malt whiskey distillery, alongside more niche brands like Krogstad aquavit and a forthcoming Guatamalan rum.

House Spirits already sells whiskey, but only in small batches. They plan to sell whiskey in such large quantities it will overtake Aviation as their largest production brand.

Westward, their single-malt whiskey, is currently a five-year-old whiskey distilled from wash made by local brewers such as Breakside Brewing. But for the past year in their new $6 million distillery on Southeast Washington Avenue, House Spirits has also been brewing the mash they use for their whiskey using a 30-barrel brew system—ranking them among the larger brewers in Portland.

“[Aviation] definitely was our flagship brand, and the thing people knew us most for—equal parts because it’s a fantastic product, but also because that’s how we behaved,” Mooney says. “We needed to make sure most of our resources went into growing that brand.”

But currently, Mooney says, they’re producing more whiskey than gin.

But because whiskey needs to be aged before it can be sold—a minimum of three years in House Spirits’ case—the sale of the Aviation brand is essentially funding House Spirits’ ability to make a vast quantity of whiskey that can’t turn a profit for years.

“We’re producing whiskey in greater quantities than we’ve ever sold Aviation,” says Mooney. “But not by a lot. It’s pretty close. This year our production of Westward is pretty similar. Westward is around 50 percent, Aviation is 40 percent, and the other 10 percent belongs to our other brands.”

House Spirits still has a long-term contract to still distill Aviation for Davos, Mooney says, although he didn’t disclose the exact terms of the agreement, nor the amount Davos paid for the trademark and recipe.

“In the past we’d been approached by potential buyers who didn’t want us to continue producing it, and we turned them down,” says Mooney. “I would say for many years it will be there—whether many is 5 or 10 or 50 years, time will tell.”

But Aviation gin will no longer be offered at House Spirits’ tasting room—including the new tasting room they plan to open at the Portland Airport this Monday, November 21.

“In the near term it’s about focusing on building our American single malt program,” says  spokesperson Alexandra Sklansky, “and working behind the scenes on a rum program.”

House Sprits will also be introducing a Guatemala-made rum called Magdalena in spring of 2017—distilled as cane liquor in Guatemala, and aged at House Spirits. Magdalena is the name of the sugar mill that makes the liquor, and also  minority investor in House Spirits.

Between the whiskey and rum, House Spirits will essentially become a different company, without Aviation as their best known product..

“It’ll feel very weird,” Mooney says.

The New Addition to the Fixin’ To Has Finally Made Good on the Bar’s Honky-Tonk Aspirations

The Fixin’ To (8218 N Lombard St., 503-477-4995) has always been a little bit outlaw-country, a little bit rock ’n’ roll. But when the playfully ramshackle, vaguely Southern-themed St. Johns bar announced plans to expand into a concert venue earlier this year, it was easy to assume what that meant: put in a makeshift stage, install a low-end PA system, and, voila, you’re a club now!

The Fixin' To
(Will Corwin)

Related: The Fixin’ To Is Expanding Into a Concert Venue

Instead, the new addition—a self-contained, 100-capacity appendage built out from the main room—has finally made good on the bar’s honky-tonk aspirations. The decor mixes Elks Lodge kitsch with handsome newness. Antlers, a taxidermied boar’s head, framed black-and-white found photographs and a majestic deer tapestry line the unscuffed blue-green walls.

The Fixin' To
(Will Corwin)

A velvet painting of Elvis sits behind a surprisingly spacious shin-high wooden stage, and the window at the back of the room assures you won’t have to leave midset to restock on Hamm’s.

The Fixin' To
(Will Corwin)

Related: These Happy Hours Are So Cheap—It’s Unreal

The Fixin' To
(Will Corwin)

Since opening this summer, the calendar has filled with emerging local indie acts, a weekly Sunday concert night and even a little hip-hop, filling a void in North Portland music venues that seems especially crucial with the impending demise of the Know.

Related: The Know Is Closing

The Fixin' To
(Will Corwin)

As for the rest of the place, nothing much has changed: the food menu is still all Southern comfort, the cocktail names still reference the Ramones and Kiss, and a portrait of a young Bill Clinton is still on prominent display. Now, if only they could get that giant Game Boy arcade machine working.

The Fixin' To
(Will Corwin)

10 Wines That Will Change Your Life

I recently tried a new Oregon pinot noir from Nicholas Jay, a new Oregon wine concern from California with some high-end backing, made by a moonlighting winemaker from Burgundy. The wine cost $65, and I didn’t really dig it.

“This wine won’t change your life,” I told my editors.

This led us down the garden path: Are there wines that cost $65 or less that you can buy in Portland that will verifiably change your life—or at least what you think about wine?

Happily the answer is a resounding “yes.” All of these 10 bottles are available in retail wine shops across the city, and all of them are not just delicious, but delicious in a way that will make you think differently about wine in general. Either they show new possibilities for grapes whose potential you thought was exhausted, like Oregon’s ubiquitous pinot noir, or may even introduce you to flavors and varietals of wine you never knew existed.

Wine doesn’t have to be expensive, but if you’re spending more than $30, you better be damn sure the bottle doesn’t suck. These very much don’t.

COS Pithos Bianco, Sicily
$33 at Liner & Elsen, 2222 NW Quimby St., 503-241-9463, linerandelsen.com.

COS-Pithos-Bianco-2013

Sicily is a hotbed of natural winemaking, working with indigenous wine varietals and old-school winemaking techniques. Giambattista Cilia, Giusto Occhipinti and Pinuccia Strano make wine together as COS, and their orange wine, Pithos Bianco, is a total mind-blower for first-time drinkers of orange wine—wines fermented in contact with the grape skin—and experienced winos alike. This wine is made from the obscure grecanico grape, vinified in clay amphora buried in the ground. The result is a wine with the weight of a red, but made from white grapes, with a color and flavor spectrum totally out of the ordinary.

Ridge Estate Cabernet Sauvignon, Santa Cruz, Calif.
$50 at Liner & Elsen.

Ridge_cab

California wine is boring and expensive, cabernet sauvignon is lame, and drinking anything with oak on it is a waste of time. And yet, one of the original Cult Cab winemakers from California, Ridge, makes an outstanding and accessible take on varietal cabernet from its estate vineyards in the Santa Cruz Mountains, where it’s been operating since 1962. Wine practices here are sneakily natural: Ridge uses only native yeasts, and minimal amounts of sulfur dioxide (those sulfites you keep hearing about). Sometimes you just want a big fucking bottle of red wine to pair with red meat, dammit. This is that but so much more—a living expression of hallowed terroir, a benchmark for American craft winemaking, an inspiration for today’s generation of hip, young winemakers—and a wonderful baseline to set against the other, weirder wines on this list.

Teutonic Alsea Pinot Noir, Alsea, Ore.
$50 at Division Wines, 3564 SE Division St., 503-234-7281, divisionwines.com.

2013-Pinot-Noir-Alsea

Some of the most singular wine in the state of Oregon gets made at Barnaby and Olga Tuttle’s Teutonic Wines, just off Southeast Powell Boulevard. They make a variety of affordable, accessible German-inspired whites, but this is the heavy hitter, taken from the tiny Alsea Vineyard in the Oregon Coast Range, just 22 miles from the ocean. The Tuttles planted this vineyard themselves in 2005, interspersed with wild plants and beehives. It is the antithesis to every boring-ass Oregon pinot you’ve tried in that it is lean, linear and not at all jammy or Syrah-like, which is the knock on a lot of what’s made here. By looking to Alsace and Germany for inspiration instead of Burgundy and California, the Tuttles are making some of our state’s most singular pinot from a wild coastal vineyard. Buy a bottle now and dive in, or if patience is your jam, set this somewhere cool for a decade and forget it—this wine is due to morph and mutate in weird, wonderful ways over the next 10 years.

2011 Cowhorn Syrah, Jacksonville, Ore.
$46 at Division Wines.

cowsyrah

Wine from Southern Oregon is about to blow up, and Cowhorn Wines in the Applegate Valley is at the head of the pack. It uses the region’s hot climate to good advantage, planting Rhône varietals that struggle further north, like roussane, marsanne, and some truly delicious syrah. This 2011 Biodynamic Estate Syrah is truly dope, coming on with big blackberry notes up front before smoothing out into something more elegant, reminiscent of the wines of Saint-Joseph in the northern Rhône. Drink this with barbecue—Rhônes and bones, brah.

Day Wines Running Bare, Dundee, Ore.
$33 at Mt. Tabor Fine Wines, 4316 SE Hawthorne Blvd., 503-235-4444, mttaborfinewines.com.

Day

More dope Southern Oregon wine, this time from Applegate Valley shaman Herb Quady, who grows some of the state’s tastiest cabernet franc at his vineyards down south. Brianne Day is quite simply one of Oregon’s most exciting winemakers, and this wine—inspired by Basque wines from Southwest France—is evidence enough to back that claim. It’s a blend of cab franc, tannat, and côt (called malbec in Argentina) that tastes like tobacco, olives and blood. You could blind-taste this with a thousand geeks and they’d never guess it was from Oregon. Or you can just drink it, like a normal person, and dig on all that texture and depth.

Paolo Bea San Valentino, Umbria, Italy
$40 at Pastaworks Wine at Providore Fine Foods, 2340 NE Sandy Blvd., 503-232-1010, providorefinefoods.com.

paolo-bea-san-valentino-rosso-umbria-igt-umbrai-italy-10153399

Pastaworks boasts some of Portland’s best wine at its two retail location—in Providore on Sandy and City Market on Northwest 21st Avenue—especially for imports from Italy. Wines from the region of Umbria are often overlooked, but the Bea wines stand out. Brothers Giuseppe and Giampiero Bea make wine from a vineyard their family has owned since at least the 15th century, growing olives, grains and grapes across 15 hectares. This is some of the most beautiful, pure, utterly natural wine made anywhere in the world—San Valentino is their entry-level red, made primarily from sangiovese, and it tastes like flowers and black tea, Chinese five-spice and tar. This is a great place to start with Paolo Bea, but if you come across any of their orange wines, buy it up and save a bottle for me.

2013 Kelley Fox Momtazi Vineyard Pinot Noir, McMinnville, Ore.
$43 at E&R Wine Shop, 6141 SW Macadam Ave., 503-246-6101, erwineshop.com.

KFox-2013-Maresh

I would mention Kelley Fox in the same breath as Brianne Day as one of Oregon’s most exciting winemakers, but their wines are utterly different. If Day Wines are a kaleidoscope of styles and experimentation, then Kelley Fox is mining more traditional territory, albeit with uncommon verve and touch. For my money, her pinots are perhaps Oregon’s best, channeling Volnay Burgundy in their complex, feminine expression of the grape. Not much of this stuff gets made, and it is an antidote to every woody, pricey pinot you wasted cash on. Fox’s Momtazi is a great place to start, from the biodynamic vineyards of the Momtazi family behind Maysara Wines.

Marie Courtin Champagne Resonance, Polisot, France
$57 at E&R Wine Shop.

resonance-champagne

Champagne is one of the wealthiest wine-growing regions in the world, second only to Bordeaux. For hundreds of years, the Champagne trade has been dominated by large blending houses—familiar names like Krug, Moët & Chandon, Veuve Clicquot and Louis Roederer. Some of these houses make delicious wine, but the grapes have to come from somewhere—and it turns out the humble farmers of the region make killer grapes on their own. Behind the big-money scenes in Champagne is a movement toward focusing on these farmer-winemaker bottlings, dubbed “grower Champagne,” indicated by the bottling label term RM (récoltant-manipulant). A star of the grower Champagne movement, Dominique Moreau makes wine as Marie Courtin—her grandmother’s name—in the southern Champagne village of Polisot. Most growers in Champagne sell their grapes to large blending houses; Moreau makes hers into utterly singular (and comparatively affordable) expressions of place. Resonance is made from 100 percent pinot noir, farmed biodynamically, vinified in stainless steel tanks, which means all that glorious yeasty pinot funk and fruit is preserved, resulting in a wine that smells as unique as it tastes. I don’t care how much cash you have—$100 or $1,000 or whatever—this is some of the best Champagne money can buy, and serves as a wonderful place to start for exploring the glories of small-batch grower Champagne.

Christophe Mignon Champagne Rosé de Saignée, Épernay, France
$60 at E&R Wine Shop.

ChristopheMignon

Our construct for this article—life-changing wine under $65—means we can sneak in another wonderful Champagne, this time from Christophe Mignon, a grower-winemaker near the village of Épernay. Mignon specializes in pinot meunier, the third grape in the Champagne trilogy (behind pinot noir and chardonnay), meaning this is a single-grape variety Champagne from the runty little brother of the region—resulting in a wine totally unique and different from commercial blended Champagne (yellow-label Veuve at Safeway, we’re looking at you). Rosé de saignée is a formerly obscure (and now hotly en vogue) style of Champagne-making in which the skin contact from grapes imparts color and flavor on the wine; in Mignon’s hands, using 100 percent pinot meunier, the results are about as unique and mind-blowing as Champagne gets. Think rose petals, oolong tea, Christmas spices, herbal liqueurs, sassafras, licorice, fruitcake—a children’s treasury of tasting notes that keep giving and giving. If you splash out for one wine on this list, consider making it this one.

Ganevat Macvin du Jura, France
$39 at Vinopolis, 1610 NW Glisan St, 503-223-6002, vinopoliswineshop.com.

Ganevat

Dessert wine is not cool, but this is a truly cool fortified dessert-style wine that you can drink whenever. It hails from the Jura, a rural backwater in eastern Alpine France that is a darling destination of the natural-wine world, and Macvin is the buzz-inducing farmer tipple of the region. Start with base wine from late harvest, when sugar content is highest—Ganevat uses savagnin, an obscure Jura grape—then add a regional take on eau-de-vie called “Marc du Jura”, combining at a ratio of two parts wine to one part booze. The result is something sweet, deeply complex, and boozy without overpowering you, almost in the same flavorscape as vermouth or chartreuse, though it’s made completely differently. Jean-François Ganevat (“Fanfan” to his friends) is one of the Jura’s buzziest producers, and his macvin is the truth. Dessert wine can be cool—there, I blew your mind.

Beer Hall: Fire and Brimstone, Belgian Fest, and the Bodhizafa Victory Lap

Let’s face facts.

With all that’s going on, everyone in this city could use a beer. Or several.

For that, you’re in luck. GABF-winning hoppy ales appear, as does a healthy dose of self-loathing brews, in the form of a massive number of smoked and chili beers. But if you just want something strong, head one down to Beliganfest, where high-alcohol ales are sure to boost your spirits, at least until the morning.

Friday, November 11

Bodhizafa Victory Lap

Georgetown Brewing’s Great American Beer Festival-topping IPA hits the taps at NWIPA this weekend, along side other wonderful Seattle-made ales and lagers tapped just in time to drown the sorrows of the work week (and election season). Get there early, given the circumstances, we expect the good stuff to go soon. N.W.I.P.A., 6350 SE Foster Rd. 6-9 pm. Free.

Saturday, November 12

Fire and Brimstone
Saraveza’s annual celebration of smokey and spicey beers may be sans Hop & Vine this year, due to the closure of the fellow Killingsworth beer spot, but it emerges from the ashes with some fantastic rare options. Beers like Bell’s Smoked Stout coalesce with jalepeno cream ales and a spicy hot tepache from Reverend Nat’s, filling the Packers bar with more sweat than the average Sunday game time. Saraveza, 1004 N Killingsworth St. 11 am-12 am, November 12. Free.

Belgianfest VII
The seventh year of Bailey’s Belgian-inspired celebration includes several new innovations. This year, the beer bar uses the event to launch the first of its Hausbier releases, a year-round series which begins with a Belgian lager from The Commons. They also start a special “fest withing a fest” at The Upper Lip, showcasing six of the finest American sour cherry ales they could get their hands on. With the typically amazing taplist also blessing the downstairs, there’s a heck of a lot to drown your sorrows with this Saturday. Bailey’s Taproom, 213 SW Broadway. 12-11:55 pm.

Cider Riot! Grand Opening
The Cider Riot! pub has been open quietly for a while, but they’ve decided it’s time to be open loudly. They’ll be throwing down verticals of the so-good-it-makes-life-seem-sad-somehow 1763 West Country-style cider, plus a potent cocktail of drinking cultures: tequila-barrel-aged Irish cider and six drafts. Cider Riot!, 807 NE Couch St. 12-9 pm. Free.

McMenamins 23rd Avenue Bottle Shop Anniversary
Limited-edition taster trays, prizes, and big discounts hit 23rd Ave’s best bottle shop this weekend, in celebration of a solid year in business. That makes this your go-to, to-go option. McMenamins 23rd Avenue Bottle Shop, 2290 NW Thurman St. 11 am-10 pm. Free.

Americano Closes Three Months after Being Named the Oregonian’s Bar of the Year

Maybe this is why the Oregonian is so loath to endorse: The local semi-daily paper’s Bar of the Year did not quite last a year.

After being named the O‘s standout bar of 2016 in August, the bar—from Hale Pele’s Blair Reynolds and Coco Donuts’ Ian Christopher—unceremoniously closed eight months into its tenure, Eater reports. Reynolds cited insufficient sales as the reason.

In visits since our initial review in April, it seemed the bar had a hard time building clientele in a transitional East Burnside neighborhood, next to a seemingly forever vacant Chopsticks building.

Related: The Past and Future Chopsticks

As a high-concept, high-profile coffee cocktail and vermouth and press-pot bar in the somewhat unpopular Burnside 26 building, Americano faced more than a few uphill battles in garnering a steady crowd, compounded by the near-immediate departure of their head chef and steady losses among barstaff with impressive resumes.

As we noted in our initial review, however, it offered quite a few pleasures despite its sterile decor:

“Within, the cafe and bar looks like a cross between a hair salon and a Duran Duran album—sterile white-on-white, with a massive ornate mirror, marble horseshoe bar and ’80s-style pop-deco coffee art spanning an entire wall. Such an apparent ode to false luxury shouldn’t be any good, nor fun. But then you notice the sparkling gamay on the menu—a delightful quaff that might as well be Champagne jam—and the preponderance of wine bottles served for under $30.”

Anyway, here’s the goodbye message from the bar.

To our friends and regulars at Americano,

Thank you for the months of joy you brought through our doors, as we discovered, together, a world of coffee, vermouth, and joyous conversation. Unfortunately, due to difficult circumstances, we are announcing our official closure. Thank you again for the opportunity to entertain you.

– The owners and staff of Americano 

Note: For those in need of a terrific coffee and vermouth bar, we very much like Locale: Expect coffee cocktails and a full liquor license in the next couple months, according to owners.

Following Trump Victory, Double Mountain Taproom Closes Temporarily in Apparent Despair

Judging from the shellshocked ghost town that greeted many early morning commuters today, a good number of Portlanders delayed their trip to work this morning following the election of Donald Trump.

At least one business in Portland made that response official.

Hood River brewery Double Mountain’s new Portland taproom and pizza pub on Woodstock Boulevard will be closed all day.

Visitors who stopped in were greeted by a sign on the door saying that “We’ll be closed all day to take time to absorb the election results. See you on Thursday.”

Screen Shot 2016-11-09 at 12.14.39 PM

This does not mean no one will be drinking at Double Mountain today, but there’s a password for entry.

On Facebook, Double Mountain brewmaster and co-owner Matt Swihart posted a picture of himself with the very first tanks he ever got as a brewer, and then invited anyone who knows his middle name to come down for a beer today.

Screen Shot 2016-11-09 at 12.21.16 PM

He then closed with the somewhat ominous note: “I’m closing shop on this post election day and deciding on our next move.” We’ve reached out for comment, but have not yet received a response.

The brewery did reassure commenters, however, that the closure is just for today.

Seven Places to Watch the 2016 Election Results in Portland

It’s judgment day, Americans, and not the kind of judgment day that involves Linda Hamilton killing robots. The stakes are arguably higher, so here are eight places you can go for sustenance and election-watching tonight.

1. Bagdad – Back Stage Bar

It’s not just a bar: It’s a bar with a hidden room! Perfect for election night meltdowns.

3702 SE Hawthorne Blvd. 6 pm. Free. 

2. Bipartisan Cafe

In an election seriously lacking in bipartisanship, what better place to go for a sandwich or a slice of pie? Sweet berry or cream pie, plus vegan and gluten-free options…mm….

7901 SE Stark St. 6 pm to 9 pm. Free.

3. Dig A Pony

(Vivian Johnson)
(Vivian Johnson)

If you want to get here in time for happy hour, make sure you arrive before 6 pm so you can get $1 off of anything. Because what’s more American than that?

736 SE Grand Ave. 5 pm. Free.

4. Grand Central Bowl

(Linnea Steves)
(Linnea Steves)

Join Willamette Week for bowling, arcade games and even candidate cocktails. Plus, attendees can use the code WWENP2016 to get $5 off two Lyft rides.

808 SE Morrison St. 3 pm to 11 pm. Free.

5. Laurelhurst Theater

Laurelhurst_joe-Riedl

You may as well watch the election results if you go here, because plenty of the movies the Laurelhurst is showing this week (like Snowden and Hell or High Water) have a political message anyway.

2735 E Burnside St. 5 pm. Free.

6. Mission Theater

Have some pizza with your politics.

1624 NW Glisan St. 4 pm door, 6 pm election coverage. Free. 

7. Paydirt

This bar, which is located in the uncontrollably awesome wedge-shaped building known as the Zipper, is offering a free champagne toast “when she wins.”

2724 NE Pacific St. Starts when the polls start to close. Free.

IMAGE: Kayla Sprint
IMAGE: Kayla Sprint

8. Revolution Hall

Revolution is doing a raffle. But honestly, what prize could compete with the fact that this election is almost over?

1300 SE Stark St # 110. 3 pm. 21 and over. Free.

Revolution Hall, formerly Washington High School
Revolution Hall, formerly Washington High School

Starting in December, Servers and Bartenders Can Legally Drink on the Job

In other states, you can buy bartenders a shot for a job well done, or just because you’re drunk and lonely.

But not in Oregon. Here, a bartender at isn’t even legally allowed to sip a beer that a customer says went bad. (It didn’t go “bad,” by the way. Drink your beer and be quiet.)

Well, starting in December, employees at OLCC-licensed shops will be allowed to drink beer while they’re working.

Just… not very much.

The Oregon Liquor Control Commission made the decision to allow minimal tastings of beer, wine or cider for employees of liquor-licensed businesses. The rule change is intended to allow servers to make sure drinks are not flawed, and to facilitate server education and wine tastings.

Tastings are limited to a maximum of one ounce per serving and a maximum of six ounces total—a bit under half a beer—between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 2:30 a.m. for employees over 21.

“It’s something the industry has been asking for for a while and we’ve been trying to look for solutions,” says OLCC spokesperson Christie Scott. “Before, it was easier to enforce it. It was easier to say, ‘you’re drinking or you’re not. But this way, it is not as black and white—but that’s the point, to carve out some exceptions that make sense.”

The rule doesn’t apply to liquor.

“It’s very limited.,” she says. “it’s not that they can drink on duty. They can taste on duty and only under certain circumstances.” 

For example, if a restaurant is doing a wine tasting, this rule allows employees to taste along with the customers. Or if a server uncorks a bottle of wine, they can taste it for quality control.

“The industry, from what we’ve heard through advisory committee meetings, is pleased. It’s something they’ve been asking for for a long time,” she says. “The administration now has been really open to change.”

But the new rule only goes so far. There’s a specific reminder that marijuana consumption is still not allowed on the premises of liquor-licensed businesses, and that it doesn’t matter if a bartender is on their lunch break.

Deschutes Brewery and Hair of the Dog Brewed a Beer Together—And It’s Really Good

Did you know Deschutes Brewery once made batches of Doggie Claws and Fred? Well, it did, replicating Hair of the Dog’s beers on its own larger system. You won’t find Deschutes beers based on recipes that have earned Hair of the Dog’s Alan Sprints a global following for his tiny Southeast Portland brewery on their own, though. Rather, they’re half the blend for the just-released small-batch bottling of Collage 2.

Related: Deschutes Brewery Will Expand to Virginia

Blending is the secret to most of the best barrel-aged beers, providing depth and nuance you don’t get from a typical oak bomb. Blending is common with barrel-aged beers that have the same base, according to Deschutes assistant brewmaster Ryan Schmiege. “Less common is the blending of completely different components to create one beautiful offering,” he says. “That was, I think it’s safe to say, what [Deschutes’] Gary Fish and Alan Sprints wanted to accomplish.” The result is extraordinary and something like a really good fruitcake—grape and apricot and vanilla and warm maltiness.

The final blend was approved by Sprints and Fish, who picked it from a few variants presented to them. It goes without saying they have great taste. Recommended.